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An Interview with Vincent Gallagher, Director of The Video Dead

by Mike Haberfelner

November 2020

Films directed by Vincent Gallagher on (re)Search my Trash

 

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Your new movie The Video Dead - in a few words, what is it about?

 

Itís a visual mindbender about a man who receives a mysterious video nasty that sends him into the deepest pits of insanity during a zombie outbreak.

 

As The Video Dead plays a riff on the video nasty scare - so could you give us a quick run-down on the whole video nasty controversy, and what do video nasties mean to you, personally?

 

I guess the idea of what it stood for is censorship, and if we had continued to censor the artist and freedom of creative expression we may now not have all the films and body of art that people know and love today.

 

I remember seeing Evil Dead when I was young, and that being a big inspiration for me. If that film had been permanently banned I may not have seen it. I think that was an important time for independent filmmakers, and when I saw that it was a key moment for me pursuing this as a career.

 

(Other) sources of inspiration when writing The Video Dead?

 

Well the whole project was a homage and nod to the horror genre. I remember seeing Joker when it came out at the cinemas and I felt that it had a similar backlash to the video nasty era. The media was speaking really negatively about the film and I thought it felt like a type of modern day censorship all because it had a cultural alternative viewpoint and free thinking ideology. Even though I thought it was the best film of the year.

 

Do talk about The Video Dead's approach to horror!

 

Iím inspired by old horror films but Iím also inspired by dystopic modern society films. Series like Black Mirror have caught my attention. I do also like experimental filmwork from Chris Cunningham and Chris Morrisís jam.

 

At least for me, The Video Dead has a very 1980s feel to it - do you at all agree, and if yes, what do the 80's mean to you, also in relation to your movie?

 ;

I wasnít around during that period of time, however I did have a similar process when it came to selection of horror films. I used to go to my local video shop and find the scariest cover I could find. A lot of the 80s horror films had such cool video covers I just had to rent them. Usually the bigger more obviously violent the cover the more I had to rent it.

 

What can you tell us about your overall directorial approach to your story at hand?

 

Well we shot the main shoot over a four day period and plenty of extra shoots afterwards. The car chase sequence we had to knock on all the neighbours doors and let them know there was going to be people covered in blood, screaming and running around. We ended up using some of the neighbours in the shoot.

 

Do talk about The Video Dead's key cast, and why exactly these people?

 

Well the main character I saw him on another video I helped out on for someone else film. I thought he seemed like he would be up for a fun project so I kept in contact. I had a film involving a butcher's but has some location issues so that project got put on hold. Think it was two years down the line we started shooting The Video Dead. Ste Pye was great on set, worked hard and was always on time. The more we work together the better he gets as an actor, and I think we can communicate better. With VHS Guy, Gold Frank, he said he was interested in being a character in the film when we put out a casting call. I knew him before and I knew he had a good look so when he turned up and gave a short performance I was sure I knew which role would be best for him. I'm looking forward to working with everyone involved again.

 

A few words about the shoot as such, and the on-set atmosphere?

 

Well the main shoot was in November right before the pandemic. Nobody had any idea that was going to happen. Luckily Iíd planned to do most of the shoot in one go. It was a great vibe on set, we had a great crew and everyone was there because they wanted to just be involved. It was very cold as it was in November and there was fake blood everywhere, but spirits were high and everyone gave 100%.

 

The $64-question of course, where can The Video Dead be seen?

 

It can be seen on our new film channel, Entheos Films Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/EntheosFilms/videos/379312026757329

 

Anything you can tell us about audience and critical reception of The Video Dead?

 

We had a big response to the empty city shots of Leeds which we got just before lockdown. There is some shots during the lockdown too that I managed to get whilst going for a run through the city.

 

Any future projects you'd like to share?

 

Well we have just released a film called Houseshare, which is well worth a watch on the page, and we have several short films we are due to release, one called Mum, a short horror film, and one called Lullaby, a drama. We are super-excited about this new company and we are working around the clock to get the next projects out. We also have a big plans for The Video Dead 2 and canít wait to get that together. We will be doing a fundraiser that will help with the budget to make it the best it can be so stay tuned.

 

What got you into filmmaking to begin with, and did you receive any formal training on the subject?

 

I realised after watching horror films it was all movie magic, but that inspired me at a young age on the craft and how all I wanted to do was make film like the ones I was watching. I saved my pocket money for a long long time and bought a tiny DV camera about 10 years old. I used to have to film, play the footage then rewind to the edit point to cut the film together as I had no editing software. I went to college but learned very little in media as it was all written. After I went to university and did a film production course, which was exciting because I had a lot more equipment to use. Then few years after I did a masters in music production. I felt I had a good visual understanding but not sound. My main bit of advice I could give any budding filmmakers is just go for it. If thereís an idea or something you liked in a film do it yourself. Be active and and donít just talk about doing something. Get a camera and use it.

 

What can you tell us about your filmwork prior to The Video Dead?

 

Before I made The Video Dead Iíve made several films under my company Tape End Productions. One of my other biggest projects to date was a film called Feedback a film that took me a few years to make inspired by the films Baraka and Samsara. It's a non narrative trippy visual documentary. I worked for a year and a half saving money with the project in mind, quit my job and went traveling and filming for 3 months with a tripod and Canon 7D. Capturing the beauty of Asia and the culture over there. I came back, broke several laptops trying to make it and finished it another year after. I've done loads of other projects. Have a look on the link below.

Feedback: https://vimeo.com/127920229

Tape End Productions: https://vimeo.com/tapeendproductions

 

How would you describe yourself as a director?

 

Iíd say I want to make cinema that gets under your skin and makes you feel uncomfortable.

 

Filmmakers who inspire you?

 

Chris Cunningham, Chris Morris, Wes Craven, Gaspar Noe, Stanley Kubrick and Sam Raimi.

 

Your favourite movies?

 

The Evil Dead, The Shining, Nightmare on Elm Street 1 & 3, Videodrome, Warp Records music videos, Old Boy, Enter The Void, Angst, Trainspotting and Midnight Cowboy. I made a list of my favourite films: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls024884719/

 

... and of course, films you really deplore?

 

Anything thatís intention is to be made to appeal to a wide audience and main objective is to make as much money as possible. Films like this are soulless and it's like bad pop music. I just have to turn it off. I didnít see them but Cats and Downton Abbey, that toffee nose upper class filmmaking bullshit, it makes me want to be sick.

 

Feeling lucky ?
Want to
search
any of my partnershops yourself
for more, better results ?

The links below
will take you
just there!!!

Find Vincent Gallagher
at the amazons ...

USA  amazon.com

Great Britain (a.k.a. the United Kingdom)  amazon.co.uk

Germany (East AND West)  amazon.de

Looking for imports ?
Find Vincent Gallagher here ...

Thailand  eThaiCD.com
Your shop for all things Thai

Your/your movie's website, social media, whatever else?

 

Stay locked for more films to come - https://www.facebook.com/EntheosFilms

 

Anything else you're dying to mention and I have merely forgotten to ask?

 

Support your local artists J

 

Thanks for the interview!

 

© by Mike Haberfelner


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Thanks for watching !!!



 

 

Robots and rats,
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Tales to Chill
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Tales to Chill
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Out now from
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On the same day
a Burglar wants to kill you
and your Ex wants
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... and for the life of it,
you can't decide
WHICH IS WORSE!!!

 

A Killer Conversation

produced by and starring
Melanie Denholme
directed by
David V.G. Davies
written by
Michael Haberfelner
starring
Ryan Hunter and
Rudy Barrow

out now on DVD